In Mississippi, it’s illegal to *explain* polygamy to anyone. Here’s io0’s map and a link to a complete list of verifiable U.S. laws about sex. (via A Map of the Weirdest Sex Laws in the United States)

In Mississippi, it’s illegal to *explain* polygamy to anyone. Here’s io0’s map and a link to a complete list of verifiable U.S. laws about sex. (via A Map of the Weirdest Sex Laws in the United States)

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I wonder if this child’s having been named such a calming, stately name as Bamboo Flute would make him so alienated from human emotions. You know, fear, empathy, compassion. Curiosity, though, he’s got in spades. Oh, Florida. 
Spoiler: Dad lived.
(via Florida Teen Named Bamboo Flute Stabbed Dad Because He “Wondered What It Would Be Like” - Miami - News - Riptide 2.0)

I wonder if this child’s having been named such a calming, stately name as Bamboo Flute would make him so alienated from human emotions. You know, fear, empathy, compassion. Curiosity, though, he’s got in spades. Oh, Florida. 

Spoiler: Dad lived.

(via Florida Teen Named Bamboo Flute Stabbed Dad Because He “Wondered What It Would Be Like” - Miami - News - Riptide 2.0)

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If you claim “stand your ground” as the reason you shot someone, what happens to you can depend less on the merits of the case than on who you are, whom you kill and where your case is decided.

[…]

Defendants claiming “stand your ground” are more likely to prevail if the victim is black. Seventy-three percent of those who killed a black person faced no penalty compared to 59 percent of those who killed a white.

A year ago, the Tampa Bay Times studied the ways in which the “Stand Your Ground” defense had been applied in the (then) seven years since it became law. This article analyses the widely varying outcome and links to a database of fatalities to which the law has been applied.

Florida ‘stand your ground’ law yields some shocking outcomes depending on how law is applied | Tampa Bay Times

In June, a Texas jury found a man not guilty of the woman he shot and killed. She was an escort, and he shot her because she kept his $150 and refused him sex. I’ll wait while you stretch your imagination to consider why on earth an escort might not consent to sex with an armed man, even if he prepaid. 

Apparently you can use lethal force in Texas to protect your property—the money—even at night. 

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From Slate’s Dumb Criminal of the Week column, a Florida man had the misfortune of being jumped and robbed at a convenience store and the further misfortune of being reported to the police by the EMTs when they discovered flakes of green in his pubic hair. 

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In stupid criminal news, a Florida man has been charged with murder after he pocked-dialed 911 while discussing the murder. Via Yahoo News.

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Aj Jazeera English reports that a Saudi man in Michigan was reported by a neighbor to the FBI when he left his house with a pressure cooker to bring a rice and meat dish to a friend’s house for dinner. 

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Amy Davidson of the New Yorker points out a few felicitous things about Monday’s escape/rescue of Amanda Berry and two other women from a house in Cleveland:

1. Charles Ramsey broke into the house next door to help a strange woman escape BECAUSE it appeared to be “a domestic violence situation.” In the past, that same idea is what made people decide to mind their own business rather than get involved. 

2. Amanda Berry never forgot who she was and that she had a right to a real life outside the walls of her captor. She used this knowledge to stay strong and stay alive. Not all abductees get this chance. Knowing you’re worth saving is not a guarantee of being saved, but it is something every woman should believe.

The extended family of Ariel Castro, who owns the house from which three long-missing women escaped this week, has a long and complex history with violence against women. This crime blog post from Cleveland Scene goes into the details of arrests and accusations and the death of a child over the last decade.
(via The Long History of Ariel Castro, Cleveland Kidnapper and Monster | Scene and Heard: Scene’s News Blog)

The extended family of Ariel Castro, who owns the house from which three long-missing women escaped this week, has a long and complex history with violence against women. This crime blog post from Cleveland Scene goes into the details of arrests and accusations and the death of a child over the last decade.

(via The Long History of Ariel Castro, Cleveland Kidnapper and Monster | Scene and Heard: Scene’s News Blog)

It might have been valuable, at some point, for us to have a discussion about whether we wanted to go down the road of having cameras everywhere. But we missed that moment—instead, you and I and everyone we know went out and bought smartphones and began snapping photos incessantly.

This Slate article comes down in favor of total surveillance. I myself think that the only way more cameras will work in terms of both security and liberty is if more people have access to public footage—not fewer people and more footage.

Boston bomber photos: The marathon bombing shows that we need more security cameras, and we need them now. - Slate Magazine